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Twelve SUNY junior faculty awarded prestigious NSF CAREER Awards

Twelve State University of New York (SUNY) scientists and engineers recently received National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER awards, an indication that the university is attracting some of the world’s brightest young researchers to New York State. 

The CAREER program offers the NSF’s most prestigious awards in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. 

The grants total $6.5 million. They will support research and educational outreach in additive manufacturing, new materials, physics, mechanism design, cyberinfrastructure, drug delivery, clean coal technology, next generation Wi-Fi and how data mining can help improve various industries.

Recipients of the grants come from three SUNY campuses – Binghamton University, Stony Brook University and the University at Buffalo. 

SUNY’s new CAREER awardees are: 

Paul Bauman
Campus: University at Buffalo
Faculty position:
PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Award amount:
$499,306

Computer models help researchers push the boundaries of science in weather prediction, materials science and countless other fields. But these models can be improved. For example, they are limited by their lack of ability to incorporate uncertain information from experimental data. The award will support Bauman’s research, which addresses this problem by developing cyberinfrastructure that improves models and enables scientists to better design experiments. 

Jason Benedict
Campus: University at Buffalo
Faculty position: PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry
Award amount: $600,000

The award will fund basic research on hole-filled crystals called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) that could one day serve as high-tech sponges, sopping up spilled oil, greenhouse gases and other chemicals. Many MOFs lose their sponging capabilities over time and Benedict’s goal is to find a way to extend the crystals’ lives so that his team can begin experiments that use MOFs to trap and release chemicals.

Jing Chen
Campus: Stony BrookUniversity
Faculty position: PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science
Award amount:
$500,000

The award will help to advance Chen’s research on mechanism design that has impact on computation and rationality problems in areas such as game theory, economics and social sciences. Chen’s main objective is to develop a theory of mechanisms with unstructured player (user) beliefs in practical information and computation models. The proposed research plans to shrink the widely open space in mechanism design with different information structures of players’ beliefs. 

Paul Chiarot
Campus: BinghamtonUniversity
Faculty position:
PhD, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Award amount:
$500,000 

The award will support Chiarot’s research, which focuses on additive manufacturing. He is developing a fast and reliable manufacturing method that provides fine feature control at the level of an individual printed layer. The main thrust of the project is to establish a repeatable method in which particles are arranged, with electrical fields, in an exact order and orientation in each layer of a device — a solar cell, for example — to control characteristics such as electrical or thermal conductivity or optical properties that affect the function of the device. 

Rezaul Chowdhury
Campus: Stony BrookUniversity
Faculty position: PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science
Award amount:
$535,000 

The award will help to advance Chowdhury’s research on developing theories and efficient tools to facilitate the design of portable parallel algorithms to be used in computing platforms ranging from small laptop computers to massive supercomputers. The project aims to make parallel programming simpler by shielding programmers from the complicated details of the ever-changing underlying hardware platforms. 

Jing Gao
Campus: University at Buffalo
Faculty position:
PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering
Award amount:
$500,613 

The award will support Gao’s research, which focuses on developing new systems to accurately mine data from mobile devices, social media and other online platforms to provide inexpensive, sustainable and large-scale solutions that improve the efficiency and cost of transportation, health care and other industries. 

Joanna Kiryluk
Campus: Stony BrookUniversity
Faculty position: PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy
Award amount:
$895,000 

The award will support Kiryluk’s research with neutrinos. In 2013, IceCube, the largest underground neutrino detector in the world, discovered the existence of a diffuse flux of highly energetic neutrinos of yet unknown origin. Kiryluk’s proposed precision measurements will give new insights in the composition of this flux. 

Dimitrios Koutsonikolas
Campus: University at Buffalo
Faculty position:
PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering
Award amount:
$555,385 

The award will support Koutsonikolas’s research, which focuses on developing next generation Wi-Fi and cellular networks that aim to solve wireless traffic jams. In particular, he is developing networks that take advantage of unoccupied, higher frequency bands that provide an opportunity to greatly increase the rate in which wireless data is shared. 

Haiqing Lin
Campus: University at Buffalo
Faculty position:
PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
Award amount:
$500,000 

The award will support Lin’s research into clean coal technology. He is developing a polymer-based membrane to remove carbon dioxide, which makes up the vast majority of greenhouse gas emissions, from gasified coal before its combustion. The membrane could ultimately help lessen the impact of burning coal, an abundant natural resource in the United States and elsewhere, on climate change. 

Jonathan Lovell
Campus: University at Buffalo
Faculty position: PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering
Award amount:
$400,000 

The award will support Lovell’s research, which focuses on developing safer and more efficient ways to control the delivery of medicine inside the body. For example, most chemotherapeutic drugs excel at fighting cancer but they interact with blood and other healthy bodily systems. This dilutes the drugs and causes unwanted side effects. Lovell is developing tiny sacs that carry drugs to their intended destination and open up when triggered by light. The method shows great promise for delivering concentrated doses of medicine and limiting side effects. 

Jeffrey Mativetsky
Campus: BinghamtonUniversity
Faculty position: PhD, Assistant Professor of Physics
Award amount:
$525,000 

The award will support Mativetsky’s research, which centers on the relationships between nanoscale structure and electrical function in organic materials for solar cells and electronics. Mativetsky believes that molecule-based nanowires could improve organic solar cell performance and enable the manufacture of flexible solar cells that are thinner than a sheet of paper. 

Jason Trelewicz
Campus:
Stony BrookUniversity
Faculty position: PhD, Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering
Award amount:
$500,000 

The award will help to advance Trelewicz’s research, which is aimed at transforming applications of high-strength metals. A problem that plagues metallic glasses is that they tend to be very brittle and can fail catastrophically. Trelewicz will use atomistic and integrated materials engineering principles to design novel metallic glasses with superior properties that can be manufactured at large-scales. These materials have the potential to revolutionize sheet metal production used in the electronics, automotive and aerospace industries.

Tags Tags: University at Buffalo , Binghamton University , Stony Brook University

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